Hopes of mandating paid family days may lose to recession

If we don't stabilize population growth, life as we know it is unlikely to continue.

With so many of us burning fossil fuels, gobbling up renewable resources, and generating toxic trash, our life support ecosystems are threatened.

Many argue that a decrease in human numbers would lead to a fiscal catastrophe, seeing that, in the last 200 years, unprecedented economic growth has been accompanied by an equally unprecedented increase in world population.

During the 1800s and 1900s, up to half of world economic growth was likely due to population growth; Georgetown University environmental historian John Mc Neill explains: "A big part of economic growth to date consists of population growth.

hopes of mandating paid family days may lose to recession-80hopes of mandating paid family days may lose to recession-4

Unfortunately,'GDP' does not differentiate between costs and benefits and we end up spending more money to fix the problems caused by population growth.

In the central North Pacific Ocean gyre, swirling plastic fragments now outweigh plankton 46 to one.

CO2 in the atmosphere is higher today than anytime in the past 650,000 years.

More hands, more work, more things produced."Gross Domestic Product (GDP), a measure of economic success or failure, is the number of people multiplied by per capita income.

Slow population growth, and economic growth will likely slow as well unless advances in productivity and spending increase at rates high enough to make up the difference.

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